Family Tree Research - Be Your Family Memory Keeper!


Every family has funny stories, sad stories, tragic stories and triumphant stories. You can be the historian and "memory keeper" of your family by starting with a family tree.

A family tree contains the names of the persons, parents, grandparents, great grandparents and sometimes, great, great grandparents. It illustrates family records of our ancestors, from one generation to another. Some people research for their roots out of curiosity. Others hope to establish their legal rights pertaining to inheritance and property.

After you have made a family tree, you can collect stories about each member of the family. You might even find yourself having enough stories to write a book!

How to start a family tree research

You need to know some basic information about your family:

  • Identify the individual you want to research
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  • Talk to living relatives who know the most about the family
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  • Ask questions about the particular family member you are researching, how many children they had for example
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  • Locate family documents, such as birth or marriage certificates and letters
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  • Write down what you know, all of the basic information (maiden names, dates and places of births, marriages, and place of death) about the person for whom you intend to carry out the family-tree
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  • Ask for full names, including middle names and nicknames
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  • The family tree research is done on Tuesdays and Thursdays only from 09:00am to 12 noon, except for emergency cases.

Go to our Service Fees section for the cost of family tree research.

Please download and fill in the family tree research form and bring it with you when you come to the Seychelles National Archives where our wonderful staff will help you draw your family tree or you can just fill in the online family tree research form, whereby the result will be sent to you by email or by post if request is from overseas.

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